May 11, 2016

Are you in the American middle class?

Pew Research Center’s new analysis shows that the American middle class lost ground in the vast majority of metropolitan areas from 2000 to 2014, and the shares of adults in the lower- and upper-income ranks rose in most areas. There was more movement into the upper-income tier in about half the areas, while in the other half there was more movement downward.

Step 1: See where you are in the distribution of Americans by income tier. Enter the location that best describes where you live, your household income and the number of people in your household. The calculator adjusts for the cost of living in your area.

Household income before taxes:
People in my household:

Based on your household income and the number of people in your household, you are in the tktk income tier, along with tktk% of adults in tktk.

tktk
Share of adults in each income tier in your metro area and in the U.S.
Share of American adults
in each income tier

Step 2: Now compare yourself to others in the U.S. with your demographic profile

Education
Less than high school
High school graduate
Two-year degree/Some college
Bachelor's degree or more
Age
18 to 29
30 to 44
45 to 64
65 or older
Race/ethnicity
White
Hispanic
Black
Asian
Other or multiracial
Marital status
Married
Not married

Among all American adults with your education, age, race or ethnicity, and marital status, tktk% are lower income, tktk% are middle income and tktk% are upper income.