Portrait of D’Vera CohnD’Vera Cohn is a Senior Writer at the Pew Research Center. She was a Washington Post reporter for 21 years, mainly writing about demographics, and was the newspaper’s lead reporter for the 2000 Census. After leaving the newspaper in 2006, she served as a consultant and freelance writer for the Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project, Brookings Institution and Population Reference Bureau. She also has advised the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism on demographic topics, and has spoken at national journalism conferences about how reporters can make use of demographic data in stories. A graduate of Bryn Mawr College, she is a former Nieman Fellow.

Mar 19, 2012

Maps and Data about the Hispanic Population

The Pew Hispanic Center has updated its demographic and economic profiles of the Hispanic and non-Hispanic populations in the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia, based on the 2010 American Community Survey of the Census Bureau. Pew Hispanic also has updated interactive maps and population counts for counties of the U.S. Hispanic population.

Feb 16, 2012

Intermarried Couples: Trends and Characteristics

A new report from the Pew Research Center’s Social & Demographic Trends project analyzes the rising prevalence of racial and ethnic intermarriage, and compares rates among different ethnic and racial groups. The report also uses public opinion data to look at changing attitudes toward intermarriage.

Jan 9, 2012

How Much Did the Foreign-Born Population Grow?

How much did the U.S. foreign-born population grow from 2009 to 2010? According to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, the number grew by 1.5 million, or 4%. But a new Pew Hispanic Center analysis concludes that the growth was markedly lower.

Dec 14, 2011

Marriage Rate Declines and Marriage Age Rises

A new Pew Research Center report analyzes trends in marriage rates, age at first marriage and number of new marriages. It finds that barely half of U.S. adults are married, continuing a downward trend. In addition, the median age at first marriage for men and women has never been higher. And the number of people who married within the past year fell 5% from 2009 to 2010.

Dec 14, 2011

Barely Half of U.S. Adults Are Married – A Record Low

Barely half of all adults in the United States—a record low—are currently married, and the median age at first marriage has never been higher for brides and grooms.

Nov 22, 2011

Cohabiting Couples and Their Money

Money-sharing by cohabiting couples is the topic of this article, which focuses on the Census Bureau’s new alternative measure of poverty. Cohabiting couples are much less likely to be considered poor under the alternative measure than the official measure of poverty’; the major reason is that the alternative measure assumes such couples share expenses, while the official measure assumes they are separate economic units.

Nov 8, 2011

Comparing Two Census Measures of Poverty

The Census Bureau has just published the results from its new alternative measure of poverty, called the Supplemental Poverty Measure, and they differ notably from the poverty rates shown by the official measure that’s been used since the 1960s. A new report by the Pew Hispanic Center compares results under both measures for key demographic groups.

Nov 7, 2011

The Rising Age Gap in Economic Well-Being

Households headed by older adults have made dramatic gains relative to those headed by younger adults in their economic well-being over the past quarter of a century.

Oct 3, 2011

Multi-generational Living During Hard Times

A new Pew Research Center report explores the demographics and economics of multi-generational households. It concludes that moving to a multi-generational household appears to lift Americans out of poverty, and this is especially true for groups most affected by the recession. Household incomes also are higher for some groups in multi-generational households.

Oct 3, 2011

Fighting Poverty in a Bad Economy, Americans Move in with Relatives

Without public debate or fanfare, large numbers of Americans enacted their own anti-poverty program in the depths of the Great Recession: They moved in with relatives.