Portrait of Gretchen LivingstonGretchen Livingston is a Senior Researcher at the Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project. Her primary areas of interest include immigrant adaptation, gender, social networks and family structure. She earned her Ph.D. in Demography and Sociology from the University of Pennsylvania, and prior to joining the Pew Research Center’s Hispanic Trends Project she was a Visiting Research Fellow at the Princeton University Office of Population Research.

Nov 14, 2014

Four-in-Ten Couples are Saying “I Do,” Again

In 2013, 40% of new marriages in the U.S. included at least one partner who had been married before. Almost 42 million Americans have been married more than once, up from 22 million in 1980.

Jun 5, 2014

Growing Number of Dads Home with the Kids

The number of fathers who do not work outside the home has nearly doubled since 1989, rising markedly in recent years. And more of these “stay-at-home” dads say they’re home primarily to care for family.

Apr 8, 2014

After Decades of Decline, A Rise in Stay-at-Home Mothers

The share of mothers who do not work outside the home rose to 29% in 2012, up from a modern-era low of 23% in 1999, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of government data.

Sep 4, 2013

At Grandmother’s House We Stay

In 2011, 7.7 million children in the U.S.–one-in-ten—were living with a grandparent, and approximately 3 million of these children were also being cared for primarily by that grandparent.1 Both of these numbers rose rapidly after the onset of the recession in 2007 and have stabilized since 2009, when the recession officially ended, according to a […]

Jul 2, 2013

The Rise of Single Fathers

A record 8% of households with minor children in the United States are headed by a single father, up from just over 1% in 1960, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of Decennial Census and American Community Survey data. The number of single father households has increased about ninefold since 1960, from less than […]

May 10, 2013

Record Share of New Mothers are College Educated

Mothers with infant children1 in the U.S. today are more educated than they ever have been. In 2011, more than six-in-ten (66%) had at least some college education, while 34% had a high school diploma or less and just 14% lacked a high school diploma, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of […]

Nov 29, 2012

Immigrant Women Lead Recent Drop in U.S. Births and Birth Rates

A new Pew Research Center report concludes that the decline in birth rates and number of births from 2007 to 2010 was led by immigrant women. Overall birth rates declined 8% during this period, but birth rates for immigrant women plunged 14%. Overall numbers of births declined 7% from 2007 to 2010, but births to immigrant mothers fell by 13%. Despite these decreases, foreign-born mothers still account for a disproportionate share of births–23% in 2010, greater than the 17% share of women of childbearing age who are immigrants.

Nov 29, 2012

U.S. Birth Rate Falls to a Record Low; Decline Is Greatest Among Immigrants

The U.S. birth rate dipped in 2011 to the lowest ever recorded, led by a plunge in births to immigrant women since the onset of the Great Recession. The overall U.S. birth rate, which is the annual number of births per 1,000 women in the prime childbearing ages of 15 to 44, declined 8% from […]

May 17, 2012

Explaining Why Minority Births Now Outnumber White Births

The nation’s racial and ethnic minority groups—especially Hispanics—are growing more rapidly than the non-Hispanic white population, fueled by both immigration and births.

Dec 14, 2011

Barely Half of U.S. Adults Are Married – A Record Low

Barely half of all adults in the United States—a record low—are currently married, and the median age at first marriage has never been higher for brides and grooms.