Pew Research CenterMar 26, 2009

Before the Great Recession, a Phantom Recovery

The eight-year period from 1999 through 2007 is the longest in modern U.S. economic history in which inflation-adjusted median household income failed to surpass an earlier peak.

Pew Research CenterMar 26, 2009

Testimony of Paul Taylor, Executive Vice President, Pew Research Center to the Senate Finance Committee

Comments on a report that combines findings of one of our major national public opinion surveys with the Center’s analysis of four decades of demographic and economic trends from the Census Bureau and other sources.

Pew Research CenterMar 19, 2009

Public Has Split Verdict on Increased Level of Unmarried Motherhood

There is a stronger consensus in public opinion about the social cost of out-of-wedlock births than there is about the morality of these births.

Pew Research CenterMar 18, 2009

Most Like It Hot

By nearly two-to-one, the public says it prefers a hotter place to live over one with a colder climate. No surprise, then, that San Diego, Tampa and Orlando rank at the top of places to live for those who favor a balmy climate.

Pew Research CenterMar 11, 2009

Magnet or Sticky?: A State-by-State Typology

“Magnet” states are those in which a high share of the adults who live there now moved there from some other state. “Sticky” states are those in which a high share of the adults who were born there live there now.

Pew Research CenterFeb 26, 2009

Suburbs Not Most Popular, But Suburbanites Most Content

Suburbanites are significantly more satisfied with their communities than are residents of cities, small towns or rural areas, but that doesn’t mean Americans want to live there.

Pew Research CenterFeb 19, 2009

Even as Housing Values Sink, There’s Comfort in Homeownership

Not even a housing-led recession can shake Americans’ faith in the blessings of homeownership.

Pew Research CenterFeb 10, 2009

McDonald’s and Starbucks: 43% Yin, 35% Yang

In the smackdown between Big Macs and caffe lattes, Americans manage to typecast themselves by just about every demographic and ideological characteristic under the sun.

Pew Research CenterJan 29, 2009

For Nearly Half of America, Grass Is Greener Somewhere Else; Denver Tops List of Favorite Cities

Nearly half of the public would rather live in a different type of community from the one they’re living in now — a sentiment that is most prevalent among city dwellers.

Pew Research CenterDec 17, 2008

Who Moves? Who Stays Put? Where’s Home?

Most Americans have moved to a new community at least once in their lives, although a notable number — nearly four-in-ten — have never left the place in which they were born.