Sep. 21, 2006

Working After Retirement: The Gap Between Expectations and Reality

More than three quarters of today’s workers expect to work for pay even after they retire. Of those who feel this way, most say it’s because they’ll want to, not because they’ll have to.

Sep. 14, 2006

Americans See Less Progress on Their Ladder of Life

As economists and politicians debate whether there is less mobility in the U.S. now than in the past, a new Pew survey finds that many among the public are seeing less progress in their own lives.

Aug. 30, 2006

American Work Life is Worsening, But Most Workers Still Content

Americans are generally satisfied with their own jobs but believe that wages, benefits, job security and employer loyalty have deteriorated over the past generation for most workers, a new survey finds.

Aug. 8, 2006

As the Price of Gas Goes Up, The Nation’s Odometer Slows Down

History Repeats Itself

Aug. 1, 2006

Americans and Their Cars: Is the Romance on the Skids?

Fewer Americans like to drive, survey shows

Jun. 14, 2006

Americans to Rest of World: Soccer Not Really Our Thing

Just 4% say it's their favorite sport to watch

May. 23, 2006

Gambling: As the Take Rises, So Does Public Concern

A modest backlash in attitudes towards legalized gambling has taken hold among an American public that spends more money on more forms of legal gambling now than at any time in the nation’s history.

May. 16, 2006

Increasingly, Americans Prefer Going to the Movies at Home

The start of the summer blockbuster movie season has Hollywood hoping for the usual stampede to the theaters, but now more than ever, the place that most Americans would rather watch movies is under their own roof.

May. 9, 2006

Calling Mom on Mother’s Day. And the Day Before. And the Day After.

The traditional holiday phone call to mom may not have the impact it once had — not because fewer sons and daughters remember to call, but because more are already talking to mom every other day of the year.

May. 2, 2006

Once Again, The Future Ain’t What It Used to Be

The idea that each generation of children will grow up to be better off than the one that preceded it has always been a part of the American dream.