DatasetsNovember 9, 2007


Survey Details: Conducted February-March 2006 File Release Date: 13 November 2007

ReportsSeptember 14, 2006

Americans See Less Progress on Their Ladder of Life

As economists and politicians debate whether there is less mobility in the U.S. now than in the past, a new Pew survey finds that many among the public are seeing less progress in their own lives.

ReportsMay 23, 2006

Gambling: As the Take Rises, So Does Public Concern

A modest backlash in attitudes towards legalized gambling has taken hold among an American public that spends more money on more forms of legal gambling now than at any time in the nation’s history.

ReportsMay 16, 2006

Increasingly, Americans Prefer Going to the Movies at Home

The start of the summer blockbuster movie season has Hollywood hoping for the usual stampede to the theaters, but now more than ever, the place that most Americans would rather watch movies is under their own roof.

ReportsMay 2, 2006

Once Again, The Future Ain’t What It Used to Be

The idea that each generation of children will grow up to be better off than the one that preceded it has always been a part of the American dream.

ReportsApril 26, 2006

In the Battle of the Bulge, More Soldiers Than Successes

At a time when the nation’s waistline has expanded to record girth, about two-thirds of American adults are either dieting, exercising or doing both. But by their own reckoning, they don’t have much to show for their efforts.

ReportsApril 19, 2006

Eating More; Enjoying Less

Americans are eating more but enjoying it less. Just 39% of adults say they enjoy eating “a great deal,” down from the 48% who said the same in a Gallup survey in 1989.

ReportsApril 11, 2006

Americans See Weight Problems Everywhere But In the Mirror

Americans believe their fellow Americans have gotten fat. They consider this a serious national problem. But when they think about weight, they appear to use different scales for different people.

ReportsMarch 28, 2006

A Barometer of Modern Morals

These edicts represent the collective judgment of the American public when asked to assess the moral dimensions of different kinds of behaviors.