May 11, 2016

The American middle class: Who is in it, and who is not, in U.S. Metropolitan Areas

» The American middle class: Who is in it, and who is not, in U.S. Metropolitan Areas
The share of adults in the middle-income tier was highest in Wausau, WI (67%) and lowest in Monroe, LA (42%). Middle-income adults lacked a majority in 50 metropolitan areas.
Share of adults in the lower-income tier in 2014
>30%
25 to 30
<25
No data
Share of adults in the middle-income tier in 2014
>55%
50 to 55
<50
No data
Share of adults in the upper-income tier in 2014
>20%
15 to 20
<15
No data
The share of adults in the lower-income tier was highest in Laredo, TX and Brownsville-Harlingen, TX (47%) and lowest in Wausau, WI, Sheboygan, WI and Barnstable Town, MA (18%).
The share of adults in the middle-income tier was highest in Wausau, WI (67%) and lowest in Monroe, LA (42%).
The share of adults in the upper-income tier was highest in Midland, TX (37%) and lowest in Laredo, TX, McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, TX, Las Cruces, NM and Visalia-Porterville, CA (9%).

Note: The map displays estimates for 229 metropolitan areas out of a total of 381 areas currently defined by the federal government. These 229 areas are the ones that are identifiable in publicly available Census Bureau datasets and for which data were available for both 2000 and 2014. They accounted for 76% of the nation’s population in 2014.

Source: Pew Research Center analysis of the 2014 American Community Survey and the 2000 Decennial Census (IPUMS)