The Great Recession has touched virtually every American. This Pew Research Center series of survey-based reports documents how the downturn shrank paychecks, shattered budgets, drained savings accounts, changed spending and borrowing habits and pushed long-term unemployment to historic levels.

Sep. 15, 2010

A Third of Public Says It’s Sometimes OK for Homeowners to Stop Making Mortgage Payments

More than a third (36%) of Americans say the practice of “walking away” from a home mortgage is acceptable, at least under certain circumstances.

Sep. 9, 2010

Since the Start of the Great Recession, More Children Raised by Grandparents

One child in 10 in the United States lives with a grandparent, a share that increased slowly and steadily over the past decade before rising sharply from 2007 to 2008, the first year of the Great Recession.

Jul. 22, 2010

Lost Income, Lost Friends – and Loss of Self-respect

Long-term unemployment takes a much deeper toll than short-term unemployment on a person’s finances, emotional well-being and career prospects.

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Jun. 30, 2010

Interactive: How the Great Recession Has Changed Life in America

Interactive graphic that charts the impact of the “Great Recession” on Americans. Polling data with breakdowns by age, education, race, gender and political affiliation.

Jun. 30, 2010

How the Great Recession Has Changed Life in America

Of the 13 recessions that the American public has endured since the Great Depression of 1929-33, none has presented a more punishing combination of length, breadth and depth than this one.

Jun. 16, 2010

Minorities and the Recession-Era College Enrollment Boom

The recession-era boom in the size of freshman classes at four-year colleges, community colleges and trade schools has been driven largely by a sharp increase in minority student enrollment.

Sep. 3, 2009

Recession Turns a Graying Office Grayer

The American work force is graying — and not just because the American population itself is graying. Older adults are staying in the labor force longer, and younger adults are staying out of it longer.