The Millennial Generation—American teens and twentysomethings—is confident, self-expressive, liberal, upbeat and open to change. The Pew Research Center examines America’s newest generation in a yearlong series of original reports. [http://pewsocialtrends.org/files/2010/11/millennials_group280x186.jpg]

Mar. 9, 2011

For Millennials, Parenthood Trumps Marriage

Today’s 18 to 29 year olds – members of the so-called Millennial Generation – see parenthood and marriage differently than today’s thirty-somethings (members of Generation X) did back when they were in their late teens and twenties, according to a new analysis of Pew Research Center survey findings. Unlike their older counterparts, Millennials value parenthood much more than marriage.

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Feb. 24, 2010

Quiz: How Millennial Are You?

Take our 14 item quiz and we’ll tell you how “Millennial” you are, on a scale from 0 to 100, by comparing your answers with those of respondents to a scientific nationwide survey. You can also find out how you stack up against others your age.

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Feb. 24, 2010

Interactive: A Portrait of Five Generations

In 2008, a record 14.6% of all new marriages in the United States were between spouses of a different race or ethnicity from one another. Rates varied by region, by state and racial group.

Feb. 24, 2010

Millennials: Confident. Connected. Open to Change

A new national survey focuses on American teens and twenty-somethings who are making the passage into adulthood at the start of a new millennium. These young people have begun to forge their generational personality: confident, self-expressive, liberal, upbeat and open to change.

Oct. 29, 2009

College Enrollment Hits All-Time High, Fueled by Community College Surge

The share of 18- to 24-year-olds attending college in the United States hit an all-time high in October 2008, driven by a recession-era surge in enrollments at community colleges.

Aug. 12, 2009

Forty Years After Woodstock, A Gentler Generation Gap

They have different values, beliefs and lifestyles, but young and old today are disagreeing without being disagreeable. Both also share a fondness for Woodstock-era rock and roll.

May. 14, 2009

Different Age Groups, Different Recessions

Older adults are less likely than younger and middle-aged adults to say that in the past year they have cut back on spending; suffered losses in their retirement accounts; or experienced trouble paying for housing or medical care.