All Things CensusAugust 10, 2011

New York City Files Census Challenge

New York City filed its official challenge to 2010 Census results today, stating that the count missed at least 50,000 people, in large part because occupied units were erroneously termed vacant.

All Things CensusDecember 20, 2010

Census 2010: Apportionment Basics

The first numbers from the 2010 Census, to be released tomorrow, are the state population totals that have been the basis of the proportional division of seats in the House of Representatives since the nation’s early days

All Things CensusDecember 15, 2010

GAO: 2010 Census Operations Successful, But Fundamental Design Needs Reform

A few days before the Census Bureau is scheduled to release the first population totals from the 2010 Census, the Government Accountability Office published three reports evaluating key operations of the decennial count.

All Things CensusAugust 4, 2010

New York Prisoners and the Census

New York legislators have passed a bill that would count prisoners at their home addresses, not those where they are incarcerated, for purposes of redrawing state and local legislative districts using data from the 2010 Census next year.

All Things CensusAugust 2, 2010

Other Ways to Conduct a Census

The Wall Street Journal’s “The Numbers Guy” columnist, Carl Bialik, has weighed in on the debate over whether Americans should be required by law to fill in their census forms, and whether there are other ways to take the census.

All Things CensusJuly 6, 2010

Should the American Community Survey Be Voluntary?

What would happen if Americans were not required by law to respond to census surveys?

All Things CensusJune 2, 2010

Census and Prisoners: More Action

The Delaware House of Representatives passed a bill this week that would count prisoners at their home addresses, not the places where they are incarcerated, for purposes of redistricting after the 2010 Census.

All Things CensusApril 15, 2010

Prisoners and the 2010 Census: New Developments

Maryland has become the first state in the nation to make plans to count prisoners at their last known home addresses, not their prison addresses, for purposes of redrawing federal, state and local legislative districts.