Multi-section ReportsJune 19, 2012

The Rise of Asian Americans

Asian Americans are more satisfied than the general public with their lives, finances and the direction of the country, according to a comprehensive new nationwide survey by the Pew Research Center.

Multi-section ReportsFebruary 16, 2012

The Rise of Intermarriage

The share of new marriages between spouses of a different race or ethnicity from each other increased to 15.1% in 2010, more than double the share in 1980.

Multi-section ReportsAugust 17, 2011

Women See Value and Benefits of College; Men Lag on Both Fronts, Survey Finds

At a time when women surpass men by record numbers in college enrollment and completion, they also have a more positive view than men about the value higher education provides.

Multi-section ReportsJune 27, 2011

Living Together: The Economics of Cohabitation

Cohabitation is an increasingly prevalent lifestyle in the United States. The share of 30- to 44-year-olds living as unmarried couples has more than doubled since the mid-1990s. Adults with lower levels of education—without college degrees—are twice as likely to cohabit as those with college degrees.

All Things CensusOctober 7, 2010

Marriage and College

Throughout the 20th century, college-educated Americans were less likely to be married by age 30 than Americans without a college degree.

Multi-section ReportsOctober 7, 2010

The Reversal of the College Marriage Gap

In a reversal of long-standing marital patterns, college-educated young adults are more likely than young adults lacking a bachelor’s degree to have married by the age of 30.

All Things CensusMay 13, 2010

Census Data Point to Low Hispanic GED Attainment

Among Americans who have not obtained a regular high school diploma, Hispanics are less likely than members of other major U.S. race and ethnic groups to acquire a General Educational Development (GED) credential.

ReportsMay 6, 2010

The New Demography of American Motherhood

Today’s mothers of newborns are older and better educated than their counterparts in 1990, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of data from the National Center for Health Statistics and U.S. Census Bureau. They are less likely to be white and less likely to be married.

ReportsFebruary 24, 2010

Millennials: Confident. Connected. Open to Change

A new national survey focuses on American teens and twenty-somethings who are making the passage into adulthood at the start of a new millennium. These young people have begun to forge their generational personality: confident, self-expressive, liberal, upbeat and open to change.

ReportsJanuary 19, 2010

Women, Men and the New Economics of Marriage

In the past, when relatively few wives worked, marriage enhanced the economic status of women more than that of men. Recently, however, the economic gains associated with marriage have been greater for men.