All Things CensusMay 2, 2012

Divorce and the Great Recession

At the Population Association of America’s annual conference in San Francisco this week, papers on the recession’s impact on families, wealth, children, young adults, older Americans and other realms of life will be presented in at least 10 of the 200-plus sessions. Much of the research is preliminary, but it raises intriguing questions. One paper tries to assess whether the poor economy has affected divorce rates.

Multi-section ReportsFebruary 16, 2012

The Rise of Intermarriage

The share of new marriages between spouses of a different race or ethnicity from each other increased to 15.1% in 2010, more than double the share in 1980.

Multi-section ReportsDecember 22, 2011

Women in the U.S. Military: Growing Share, Distinctive Profile

The women who serve in today’s military differ from the men who serve in a number of ways.

All Things CensusDecember 14, 2011

Marriage Rate Declines and Marriage Age Rises

A new Pew Research Center report analyzes trends in marriage rates, age at first marriage and number of new marriages. It finds that barely half of U.S. adults are married, continuing a downward trend. In addition, the median age at first marriage for men and women has never been higher. And the number of people who married within the past year fell 5% from 2009 to 2010.

Multi-section ReportsDecember 14, 2011

Barely Half of U.S. Adults Are Married – A Record Low

Barely half of all adults in the United States—a record low—are currently married, and the median age at first marriage has never been higher for brides and grooms.

Multi-section ReportsJune 27, 2011

Living Together: The Economics of Cohabitation

Cohabitation is an increasingly prevalent lifestyle in the United States. The share of 30- to 44-year-olds living as unmarried couples has more than doubled since the mid-1990s. Adults with lower levels of education—without college degrees—are twice as likely to cohabit as those with college degrees.

Multi-section ReportsMarch 9, 2011

For Millennials, Parenthood Trumps Marriage

Today’s 18 to 29 year olds – members of the so-called Millennial Generation – see parenthood and marriage differently than today’s thirty-somethings (members of Generation X) did back when they were in their late teens and twenties, according to a new analysis of Pew Research Center survey findings. Unlike their older counterparts, Millennials value parenthood much more than marriage.

All Things CensusNovember 18, 2010

Marriage and Family: Data and Attitudes

A report from the center’s Social & Demographic Trends project, “The Decline of Marriage and Rise of New Families,” finds that nearly four-in-ten Americans (39%) say that marriage is becoming obsolete.

Multi-section ReportsNovember 18, 2010

The Decline of Marriage And Rise of New Families

The pre-eminent family unit of the mid-20th century—mom, dad and the kids—no longer has the stage to itself. A variety of new arrangements have emerged, giving rise to a broader and evolving definition of what constitutes a family.

All Things CensusOctober 22, 2010

Is the Great Recession Linked to a Decline in Marriage?

There is wide interest by researchers and journalists in finding data from the Census Bureau and other sources that could illustrate the impacts of the Great Recession on American life.