Pew Research CenterMay 28, 2009

Most Middle-Aged Adults Are Rethinking Retirement Plans

In the midst of a recession that has taken a heavy toll on many nest eggs, just over half of all working adults ages 50 to 64 say they may delay their retirement — and another 16% say they never expect to stop working.

Pew Research CenterMay 14, 2009

Different Age Groups, Different Recessions

Older adults are less likely than younger and middle-aged adults to say that in the past year they have cut back on spending; suffered losses in their retirement accounts; or experienced trouble paying for housing or medical care.

Pew Research CenterApr 23, 2009

Luxury or Necessity? The Public Makes a U-Turn

From the kitchen to the laundry room to the home entertainment center, Americans are paring down the list of familiar household appliances they say they can’t live without.

Pew Research CenterMar 26, 2009

Before the Great Recession, a Phantom Recovery

The eight-year period from 1999 through 2007 is the longest in modern U.S. economic history in which inflation-adjusted median household income failed to surpass an earlier peak.

Pew Research CenterMar 26, 2009

Testimony of Paul Taylor, Executive Vice President, Pew Research Center to the Senate Finance Committee

Comments on a report that combines findings of one of our major national public opinion surveys with the Center’s analysis of four decades of demographic and economic trends from the Census Bureau and other sources.

Pew Research CenterFeb 19, 2009

Even as Housing Values Sink, There’s Comfort in Homeownership

Not even a housing-led recession can shake Americans’ faith in the blessings of homeownership.

Pew Research CenterJul 29, 2008

America’s Four Middle Classes

There isn’t one American middle class; there are four. Each is different from the others in its attitudes, outlook and financial circumstance—sometimes in ways that defy traditional stereotypes of the middle class.

Pew Research CenterJun 25, 2008

Baby Boomers: The Gloomiest Generation

America’s baby boomers are in a collective funk. Members of the large generation born from 1946 to 1964 are more downbeat about their lives than are adults who are younger or older.

Pew Research CenterMay 29, 2008

The Middle Class Blues

When it comes to anxiety about family finances, an old truism applies: Where you stand depends on where you sit. Or, more precisely, on where your house or apartment sits.

Pew Research CenterMay 14, 2008

Feeling Guilty

Most Americans say they’re not saving as much as they should — but they’re apparently not worried enough to do much about it.