Pew Research CenterFeb 21, 2013

Young Adults After the Recession: Fewer Homes, Fewer Cars, Less Debt

After running up record debt-to-income ratios during the bubble economy of the 2000s, young adults shed substantially more debt than older adults did during the Great Recession and its immediate aftermath—mainly by virtue of owning fewer houses and cars, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of Federal Reserve Board and other government data. […]

Pew Research CenterMar 15, 2012

The Boomerang Generation

If there’s supposed to be a stigma attached to living with mom and dad through one’s late twenties or early thirties, today’s “boomerang generation” didn’t get that memo.

Pew Research CenterDec 14, 2011

Barely Half of U.S. Adults Are Married – A Record Low

Barely half of all adults in the United States—a record low—are currently married, and the median age at first marriage has never been higher for brides and grooms.

Pew Research CenterNov 22, 2011

Cohabiting Couples and Their Money

Money-sharing by cohabiting couples is the topic of this article, which focuses on the Census Bureau’s new alternative measure of poverty. Cohabiting couples are much less likely to be considered poor under the alternative measure than the official measure of poverty’; the major reason is that the alternative measure assumes such couples share expenses, while the official measure assumes they are separate economic units.

Pew Research CenterOct 3, 2011

Multi-generational Living During Hard Times

A new Pew Research Center report explores the demographics and economics of multi-generational households. It concludes that moving to a multi-generational household appears to lift Americans out of poverty, and this is especially true for groups most affected by the recession. Household incomes also are higher for some groups in multi-generational households.

Pew Research CenterOct 3, 2011

Fighting Poverty in a Bad Economy, Americans Move in with Relatives

Without public debate or fanfare, large numbers of Americans enacted their own anti-poverty program in the depths of the Great Recession: They moved in with relatives.

Pew Research CenterSep 27, 2011

Census Bureau: Flaws in Same-Sex Couple Data

The Census Bureau today released its first estimates of the number of same-sex married couples in the U.S., as well as alternatives counts to the published data for same-sex unmarried couples that try to account for data-processing issues.

Pew Research CenterAug 25, 2011

How Accurate Are Counts of Same-Sex Couples?

This posting discusses the challenges for the Census Bureau in counting same-sex couples, married and unmarried. The accuracy of data depends on responses in Census Bureau questionnaires and bureau procedures to collect and edit responses, and the posting describes both.

Pew Research CenterJun 27, 2011

Census Data on Unmarried Partners

This All Things Census posting announces a new Pew Research Center report using census data to explore the economics of cohabitation, which uses census data to compare the financial well-being of adults who are married, living with an unmarried opposite-sex partner, or not living with such a partner or spouse. The Census Bureau is releasing detailed local-level counts of unmarried couples over the summer.

Pew Research CenterJun 27, 2011

Living Together: The Economics of Cohabitation

Cohabitation is an increasingly prevalent lifestyle in the United States. The share of 30- to 44-year-olds living as unmarried couples has more than doubled since the mid-1990s. Adults with lower levels of education—without college degrees—are twice as likely to cohabit as those with college degrees.