All Things CensusJune 27, 2011

Census Data on Unmarried Partners

This All Things Census posting announces a new Pew Research Center report using census data to explore the economics of cohabitation, which uses census data to compare the financial well-being of adults who are married, living with an unmarried opposite-sex partner, or not living with such a partner or spouse. The Census Bureau is releasing detailed local-level counts of unmarried couples over the summer.

Multi-section ReportsJune 27, 2011

Living Together: The Economics of Cohabitation

Cohabitation is an increasingly prevalent lifestyle in the United States. The share of 30- to 44-year-olds living as unmarried couples has more than doubled since the mid-1990s. Adults with lower levels of education—without college degrees—are twice as likely to cohabit as those with college degrees.

All Things CensusJune 23, 2011

Census 2010 News Stories: The Changing Family

The ongoing release of so-called SF1 data from the 2010 Census–detailed local-level tabulations about age, families, housing and other topics–has produced a wave of news stories about the changing family. Stories from newspapers in California and Pennsylvania focus especially on same-sex couples.

Multi-section ReportsJune 15, 2011

A Tale of Two Fathers

In the last 50 years, fathers have become much more involved in the day-to-day lives of the children they live with. During that same time period, though, the share of fathers living apart from their children has risen dramatically, to 27% in 2010.

All Things CensusApril 22, 2011

Census 2010: Household Size Trends

The average size of U.S. households has been declining for decades, but may have grown in recent years, at least in part because of an increase in multi-generational households.

All Things CensusApril 8, 2011

Family Meals, Cohabitation and Divorce

More than 2,000 demographers, sociologists and others converged on Washington, D.C., last week for the Population Association of America’s annual meeting.

Multi-section ReportsFebruary 16, 2011

The Public Renders a Split Verdict On Changes in Family Structure

The American public is sharply divided in its judgments about the sweeping changes in the structure of the American family that have unfolded over the past half century. About a third generally accepts the changes; a third is tolerant but skeptical; and a third considers them bad for society.

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InteractivesFebruary 16, 2011

Interactive: Attitudes about the Changing American Family

The American public is sharply divided in its judgments about the sweeping changes in the structure of the American family that have unfolded over the past half century.

ReportsJanuary 13, 2011

A Portrait of Stepfamilies

Today, more than four-in-ten American adults have at least one step relative in their family – either a stepparent, a step or half sibling or a stepchild.

All Things CensusNovember 18, 2010

Marriage and Family: Data and Attitudes

A report from the center’s Social & Demographic Trends project, “The Decline of Marriage and Rise of New Families,” finds that nearly four-in-ten Americans (39%) say that marriage is becoming obsolete.