Pew Research CenterFebruary 7, 2013

Second-Generation Americans

Chapter 1: Overview Second-generation Americans—the 20 million adult U.S.-born children of immigrants—are substantially better off than immigrants themselves on key measures of socioeconomic attainment, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. They have higher incomes; more are college graduates and homeowners; and fewer live in poverty. In all of […]

Pew Research CenterDecember 20, 2010

Baby Boomers Approach 65 – Glumly

As the leading edge of the giant Baby Boomer generation turns 65 on January 1, 2011, a Pew Research roundup of new and recent surveys finds that this age group is more downbeat than others about the trajectory of their lives and the direction of the nation as a whole. This report explores Boomers’ political and social values; their economic hopes and fears and their overall satisfaction with life.

Pew Research CenterJuly 22, 2010

Lost Income, Lost Friends – and Loss of Self-respect

Long-term unemployment takes a much deeper toll than short-term unemployment on a person’s finances, emotional well-being and career prospects.

Pew Research CenterJanuary 12, 2010

Blacks Upbeat about Black Progress, Prospects

Assessments about the state of black progress in America have improved more dramatically among blacks during the past two years than at any time in the past quarter century.

Pew Research CenterSeptember 17, 2009

Take this Job and Love It

Self-employed adults are significantly more satisfied with their jobs than other workers. They’re also more likely to work because they want to and not because they need a paycheck.

Pew Research CenterJune 29, 2009

Growing Old in America: Expectations vs. Reality

There is a sizable gap between the expectations that young and middle-aged adults have about old age and the actual experiences reported by older adults themselves.

Pew Research CenterJune 25, 2008

Baby Boomers: The Gloomiest Generation

America’s baby boomers are in a collective funk. Members of the large generation born from 1946 to 1964 are more downbeat about their lives than are adults who are younger or older.

Pew Research CenterJanuary 4, 2007

Most Americans Moderately Upbeat About Family Finances in 2007

Most Americans are moderately upbeat about their family’s financial prospects in the coming year, with 57% expecting some improvement in their financial situation and another 10% expecting a lot of improvement.

Pew Research CenterSeptember 14, 2006

Americans See Less Progress on Their Ladder of Life

As economists and politicians debate whether there is less mobility in the U.S. now than in the past, a new Pew survey finds that many among the public are seeing less progress in their own lives.

Pew Research CenterAugust 30, 2006

American Work Life is Worsening, But Most Workers Still Content

Americans are generally satisfied with their own jobs but believe that wages, benefits, job security and employer loyalty have deteriorated over the past generation for most workers, a new survey finds.