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Dec. 17, 2013

International Migrants by Country

Explore the population of international migrants by country with this interactive. International migrants include many foreign workers, international students, refugees and their descendants.

Dec. 17, 2013

Changing Patterns of Global Migration and Remittances

Patterns of global migration and remittances have shifted in recent decades, even as both the number of immigrants and the amount of money they send home have grown, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of data from the United Nations and the World Bank.

Mar. 18, 2009

Most Like It Hot

By nearly two-to-one, the public says it prefers a hotter place to live over one with a colder climate. No surprise, then, that San Diego, Tampa and Orlando rank at the top of places to live for those who favor a balmy climate.

Mar. 11, 2009

Magnet or Sticky?: A State-by-State Typology

“Magnet” states are those in which a high share of the adults who live there now moved there from some other state. “Sticky” states are those in which a high share of the adults who were born there live there now.

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Mar. 11, 2009

Interactive: Sticky States

“Magnet” states are those in which a high share of the adults who live there now moved there from some other state. “Sticky” states are those in which a high share of the adults who were born there live there now.

Jan. 29, 2009

For Nearly Half of America, Grass Is Greener Somewhere Else; Denver Tops List of Favorite Cities

Nearly half of the public would rather live in a different type of community from the one they’re living in now — a sentiment that is most prevalent among city dwellers.

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Dec. 17, 2008

Map: U.S. Migration Flows

Most Americans have moved to a new community at least once in their lives, although a notable number — nearly four-in-ten — have never left the place in which they were born.

Dec. 17, 2008

Who Moves? Who Stays Put? Where’s Home?

Most Americans have moved to a new community at least once in their lives, although a notable number — nearly four-in-ten — have never left the place in which they were born.