Feb. 22, 2011

Who Are the People in Your Neighborhood?

People who turn to the Census Bureau’s latest data release in an effort to answer Sesame Street’s musical query may, in some cases, be puzzled by what they find.

Nov. 22, 2010

Migration Ups and Downs

Net migration–the number of people who move into a place minus the number who move out–can reflect local economic conditions, but a new analysis of population loss in rural areas finds that other factors also can play a role.

Oct. 15, 2010

Hispanic Eligible Voters, by State

Using 2008 American Community Survey data, the Pew Hispanic Center has constructed demographic and socioeconomic profiles of eligible Hispanic voters in 27 states with the largest numbers of them.

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Jun. 4, 2010

Interactive: Interracial Marriage: Who and Where

In 2008, a record 14.6% of all new marriages in the United States were between spouses of a different race or ethnicity from one another. Rates varied by region, by state and racial group.

May. 3, 2010

Latino Population by County

Updated maps of the U.S. Hispanic population by county are available on the Pew Hispanic Center website. They show population numbers, shares and growth for 1980, 1990, 2000 and 2008, using population estimates and Decennial Census data from the U.S. Census Bureau.  The county data for 1990, 2000 and 2008 also can be downloaded.

Mar. 15, 2010

College Students Count in the Census, but Where?

Where should college students be counted in the 2010 Census–at their parents’ home or their school address?

Feb. 11, 2010

Counting Prisoners in the 2010 Census

When the Census Bureau counts prisoners, they are tallied at their prison addresses because that is their usual residence under census rules.

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Oct. 15, 2009

Marriages and Divorce: A 50-State Tour

The proportion of Americans who are currently married has been diminishing for decades and is lower than it has been in at least half a century.

Aug. 7, 2009

Go West, Old Man

If a latter-day Ponce de Leon were to search for a modern fountain of youth, he’d do well to explore America’s West. There he’d find the highest concentration of older adults in the United States who don’t think of themselves as old.

Mar. 18, 2009

Most Like It Hot

By nearly two-to-one, the public says it prefers a hotter place to live over one with a colder climate. No surprise, then, that San Diego, Tampa and Orlando rank at the top of places to live for those who favor a balmy climate.