The Growing Population of Older People in the U.S., Germany and Italy
Pew Research CenterMay 21, 2015

The Growing Population of Older People in the U.S., Germany and Italy

The United States is turning gray, with the number of people ages 65 and older expected to nearly double by 2050. This major demographic transition has implications for the economy, government programs such as Social Security and families across the U.S.

Pew Research CenterMay 21, 2015

Family Support in Graying Societies

America is turning gray, with the share of people ages 65 and older expected to rise more than 50% by 2050 – a trend that may burden more families. But Germany and Italy are already there, with a fifth of their population in that age range.

Pew Research CenterFeb 7, 2013

Second-Generation Americans, by the Numbers

A new Pew Research Center analysis of Census Bureau data finds that U.S.-born adult children of immigrants are better off than immigrants on key measures of socio-economic well-being. The same report analyzes survey data on Hispanics and Asian Americans, comparing attitudes of immigrants and U.S.-born children of immigrants on politics, values, language use and other measures.

Pew Research CenterJan 12, 2011

State Population Estimates and Census 2010 Counts: Did They Match?

How well did the Census Bureau’s population estimates for the first decade of the 21st century match the actual counts from the 2010 Census?

Pew Research CenterDec 6, 2010

The 2010 U.S. Population Is…

The Census Bureau today released five sets of population estimates for the nation as of April 1–but not from the soon-to-be-released 2010 Census count.

Pew Research CenterJan 26, 2010

How the Population Clock Works

The population clock on the All Things Census page is derived using national-level data from the U.S. Census Bureau, which produces estimates of the country’s total resident population and the components that are the building blocks of  demographic change. Those components include births, deaths and net international migration, computed using data from the Census Bureau […]

Pew Research CenterFeb 11, 2008

U.S. Population Projections: 2005-2050

If current trends continue, the population of the United States will rise to 438 million in 2050, from 296 million in 2005, and 82% of the increase will be due to immigrants arriving from 2005 to 2050 and their U.S.-born descendants.