The Growing Population of Older People in the U.S., Germany and Italy
May. 21, 2015

The Growing Population of Older People in the U.S., Germany and Italy

The United States is turning gray, with the number of people ages 65 and older expected to nearly double by 2050. This major demographic transition has implications for the economy, government programs such as Social Security and families across the U.S.

May. 21, 2015

Family Support in Graying Societies

America is turning gray, with the share of people ages 65 and older expected to rise more than 50% by 2050 – a trend that may burden more families. But Germany and Italy are already there, with a fifth of their population in that age range.

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Aug. 22, 2013

Race in America: Tracking 50 Years of Demographic Trends

Explore the areas where the white-black racial gap has narrowed, widened or remained roughly the same, based on data from U.S. government sources over the past several decades. Hispanic and Asian data is also included in years available.

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Apr. 4, 2013

Demographics of Asian Americans

The demographic data shown here display the varied population sizes and characteristics of the largest Asian origin groups. The numbers shown here come from two Census Bureau sources. The population rankings use counts from the 2010 Census for the total Asian-American population and for 20 Asian origin subgroups. The adult characteristics table is derived from […]

Feb. 7, 2013

Second-Generation Americans, by the Numbers

A new Pew Research Center analysis of Census Bureau data finds that U.S.-born adult children of immigrants are better off than immigrants on key measures of socio-economic well-being. The same report analyzes survey data on Hispanics and Asian Americans, comparing attitudes of immigrants and U.S.-born children of immigrants on politics, values, language use and other measures.

Feb. 7, 2013

Second-Generation Americans

Chapter 1: Overview Second-generation Americans—the 20 million adult U.S.-born children of immigrants—are substantially better off than immigrants themselves on key measures of socioeconomic attainment, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. They have higher incomes; more are college graduates and homeowners; and fewer live in poverty. In all of […]

Dec. 14, 2012

Census Bureau Lowers U.S. Growth Forecast, Mainly Due to Reduced Immigration and Births

The Census Bureau has released new U.S. population projections that assume a markedly lower level of growth than the agency predicted in the previous projections in 2008. Most of the reduced growth is due to lower projected immigration, but the bureau also forecast lower birth rates than it previously assumed.

Nov. 29, 2012

U.S. Birth Rate Falls to a Record Low; Decline Is Greatest Among Immigrants

The U.S. birth rate dipped in 2011 to the lowest ever recorded, led by a plunge in births to immigrant women since the onset of the Great Recession. The overall U.S. birth rate, which is the annual number of births per 1,000 women in the prime childbearing ages of 15 to 44, declined 8% from […]

Nov. 7, 2012

A Milestone En Route to a Majority Minority Nation

The minority groups that carried President Obama to victory yesterday by giving him 80% of their votes are on track to become a majority of the nation’s population by 2050, according to projections by the Pew Research Center. They currently make up 37% of the population, and they cast a record 28% of the votes […]

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Jun. 19, 2012

Video: The Rise of Asian Americans

Panel discussion on the Pew Research Center’s Asian Americans survey featuring Elaine Chao, Neera Tanden, Benjamin Wu, Karthick Ramakrishnan and Tritia Toyota.