Apr. 22, 2010

U.S. Hispanics by Country of Origin

The Pew Hispanic Center has released 10 statistical profiles of U.S. Hispanics by their country of origin, based on self-described family ancestry or place of birth in response to questions on the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Apr. 1, 2010

New Survey: Hispanics and the 2010 Census

Foreign-born Hispanics know more about the 2010 Census than their U.S.-born counterparts, and are more likely to say that they have participated or definitely will, according to a nationwide survey released today.

Mar. 31, 2010

Updated Profiles of Hispanic and Foreign-Born U.S. Residents

The Pew Hispanic Center’s statistical profiles of Hispanics and foreign-born U.S. residents have been updated using 2008 data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Mar. 3, 2010

Census History: Counting Hispanics

Despite the long history of Hispanic residents in the United States, there was no systematic effort to count this group separately in the Census until the late 20th century.

Jan. 25, 2010

Racial Labeling in Survey Questions

Over the past seven decades, America’s pollsters have used “colored,” “Negro,” “African American,” “Afro-American” and “black” in questions in national surveys.

Jan. 21, 2010

Updated Data on U.S. Immigrants and Hispanics

The Pew Hispanic Center today updated its statistical profiles of the nation’s 38 million foreign-born residents, and nearly 47 million Hispanics.

Jan. 21, 2010

Race and the Census: The "Negro" Controversy

The topic of racial identification on census forms has a long, fascinating history, which has generated fresh debate as the 2010 Census begins.

Jan. 12, 2010

Blacks Upbeat about Black Progress, Prospects

Assessments about the state of black progress in America have improved more dramatically among blacks during the past two years than at any time in the past quarter century.

Sep. 24, 2009

Black-White Conflict Isn’t Society’s Largest

It may surprise anyone who has been following the charges of racism that have flared up during the debate over President Obama’s health care proposals, but the American public doesn’t see race as the source of the strongest social conflict in the country today.

Feb. 11, 2008

U.S. Population Projections: 2005-2050

If current trends continue, the population of the United States will rise to 438 million in 2050, from 296 million in 2005, and 82% of the increase will be due to immigrants arriving from 2005 to 2050 and their U.S.-born descendants.