Aug. 9, 2012

Census Bureau Pursues New Questions on Race and Hispanic Origin

This posting includes links to newly released Census Bureau research on how Americans should be asked about their race and ethnicity. It links to a previous posting that explains the background behind this ground-breaking research.

Aug. 7, 2012

Census Bureau Considers Changing Its Race/Hispanic Questions

The race and Hispanic origin categories on the 2010 Census form (and many other government forms) do not always match people’s self-identification, and this is especially true for Hispanics. The Census Bureau will present results of research on alternative questionnaire designs and wording that attempts to address the issue.

Apr. 26, 2012

Census Bureau Pushes Online Survey Response Option

Starting in 2013, the Census Bureau would like all of the more than 3 million households that receive its American Community Survey to be pushed to respond online, instead of mailing back the traditional paper questionnaire. The bureau recently released results of a test of online response that had some encouraging results.

Apr. 3, 2012

The 1940 Census: A Few FAQs

The release of records from the 1940 Census will help people research their family history, although at first the records can only be searched by address, not name. This posting details some of the findings and methods of the 1940 Census.

Apr. 2, 2012

Sample Surveys and the 1940 Census

The 1940 Census was notable in the history of census-taking because it was the first in which some questions were asked of sample of Americans. This change enabled the Census Bureau to add questions to the form that were relevant to the Great Depression, and opened the door to the widened use of sample surveys in later censuses.

Nov. 8, 2011

Comparing Two Census Measures of Poverty

The Census Bureau has just published the results from its new alternative measure of poverty, called the Supplemental Poverty Measure, and they differ notably from the poverty rates shown by the official measure that’s been used since the 1960s. A new report by the Pew Hispanic Center compares results under both measures for key demographic groups.

Sep. 27, 2011

Census Bureau: Flaws in Same-Sex Couple Data

The Census Bureau today released its first estimates of the number of same-sex married couples in the U.S., as well as alternatives counts to the published data for same-sex unmarried couples that try to account for data-processing issues.

Sep. 22, 2011

Census Bureau Releases 2010 American Community Survey Data

The Census Bureau today released data from the 2010 American Community Survey that expands on the basic demographics in the 2010 Census. Links to the data and special reports are included in this posting.

Sep. 8, 2011

Using Census Data To Track Change Since 9/11/2001

Census data can be used to measure change since the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, as illustrated by a Wall Street Journal story about lower Manhattan. The Census Bureau itself has published a case study of how one group used census data to argue successfully for an expanded relief-distribution zone in New York’s Chinatown.

Aug. 25, 2011

How Accurate Are Counts of Same-Sex Couples?

This posting discusses the challenges for the Census Bureau in counting same-sex couples, married and unmarried. The accuracy of data depends on responses in Census Bureau questionnaires and bureau procedures to collect and edit responses, and the posting describes both.